Author Archive of Waseniorlobby

Aging and Long-Term Support Administration (ALTSA) Report
washington seal

Linked below is the report given by Bill Moss, Assistant Secretary, ALTSA DSHS, to the Legislature on January 17, 2017. ALTSA report

Read more
As world grays, seniors step up to create an ‘age-friendly’ future

In almost every country in the world, average ages are rising fast, putting pressure on city councils, health-care systems, and national economies. And the solution may be the empowerment of older people themselves. How society embraces people living longer – at home, in the office, in the mall, or at church – will revolutionize the way people experience getting older. “Longevity will change our religion, it will change our work, it will change

Read more
“(Don’t Wanna) Work ‘Til We Die” a new video

http://www.eoionline.org/blog/video-dont-wanna-work-til-we-die/

Read more
2016 Final Report of the Aging & Disability Joint Legislative Executive Committee
cap-bldg-7

The purpose of the committee is to identify key strategic actions to prepare for the aging of the population in Washington, including state budget and policy options, by conducting at least, but not limited to, the following tasks: (i) Establish a profile of Washington's current population of older people and people with disabilities and a projection of population growth through 2030; (ii) Establish an inventory of services and supports currently

Read more
Older Adults Are Still Skipping Vaccinations
vaccs

It’s an ongoing and vexing public health problem: People once vigilant about vaccinating their children aren’t nearly as careful about protecting themselves as they age, even though diseases like influenza, pneumonia and shingles (a.k.a. herpes zoster) are particularly dangerous for older people.   http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/02/health/shingles-vaccine.html?mabReward=CTM&recp=4&action=click&pgtype=Homepage®ion=CColumn&module=Recommendation&src=rechp&WT.nav=RecEngine

Read more
2016 FALL CONFERENCE
fall_confrence_website

The 2016 Fall Conference of the Washington state Senior Citizens' Foundation was held October 27th at the Hotel Murano in Tacoma. Presentations marked with * can be accessed by clicking where indicated.  Read more  

Read more
Divided America: Easy retirement? Only for a privileged few
nest-egg

Most U.S. households are heading for a worse lifestyle in retirement than they had while they were working, because they simply aren't saving enough, experts say. Thirty-five percent of households in their prime earning years or later have nothing saved in a retirement account and no access to a traditional pension, according to an AP analysis of savings data from the Federal Reserve. http://bigstory.ap.org/article/a0f8d3ab3aed48b2809f3081e2361336/divided-america-easy-retirement-only-privileged-few

Read more
PUD invests $11.2 million in energy-storing units

EVERETT — Don’t be deceived: They look like shipping containers. But the rows of massive metal boxes could contain the utility industry’s future. At least, that’s the hope of officials at the Snohomish County Public Utility District, which is installing a huge battery system near downtown Everett. The district’s goal for the $11.2 million project is to make energy storage cheaper and more flexible for utilities.   http://www.heraldnet.com/news/pud-invests-in-11-2-million-in-energy-storing-units/

Read more
Medicare Proposal Takes Aim at Diabetes

The Obama administration plans  to propose expanding Medicare to cover programs to prevent diabetes among millions of people at high risk of developing the disease, marking the sixth anniversary of the Affordable Care Act with the prospect of a new benefit, federal officials said.   http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/23/us/politics/medicare-proposal-takes-aim-at-diabetes.html?action=click&contentCollection=Politics&module=RelatedCoverage®ion=Marginalia&pgtype=article

Read more
What Could I Possibly Learn From a Mentor Half My Age? Plenty

How on earth did I become an “older worker?” It was only a few years ago, it seems, that I set out to climb the ladder in my chosen field. That field happens to be journalism, but it shares many attributes with countless other workplaces. For instance, back when I was one of the youngest people in the room, I was helped by experienced elders who taught me the ropes. Now, shockingly, I’m one of the elders. And I’ve watched my industry undergo

Read more
Too Old for Hard Labor, but Still on the Job

LIKE many people, Steve Guadalupe has had a varied career. Now 68 and living in Miami, he started in the Air Force working in personnel. He left in 1983, using his technology background to get jobs at centralized bank data centers. When that work dried up in the late ’80s, he shifted into construction, eventually ending up on a maintenance crew for a six-story medical building on the grounds of the Baptist Hospital of Miami. “Climbing up and

Read more
The art of downsizing

These days, for many homeowners, bigger isn't always better. Many Americans are opting for minimalism and smaller homes over mega mansions and extravagance. Whether you prefer a small, cozy home over a larger, more cavernous one, are an empty nester or just prefer to live a more minimal lifestyle, downsizing is a current trend not only in real estate, but also in home decor.   http://www.recordpub.com/real%20estate/2016/09/02/design-recipes-the-art-of-downsizing

Read more
Love and Burnout: Caregivers, Too, Need Care

Though caregiving can be a profound and moving journey, caregivers’ needs are often overlooked. The health care system is mainly focused on patients; caregivers who are slowly burning out can slip by unnoticed until it is too late. http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/03/your-money/caregivers-alzheimers-burnout.html

Read more
Pushing back retirement age to 70 would be harder on low-income workers

It sounds like a simple fix to the nation's immense problem of funding Social Security and Medicare for an aging country — just get everyone to work to 70 and the math works out a lot better. But this idea, despite being embraced by a number of politicians, has a long way to go. It's being challenged in academic circles as a new form of inequality. This one has been dubbed "longevity inequality."   http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/columnists/ct-marksjarvis-column-social-security-inequality-0828-20160828-column.html

Read more
Frugal couple wonder if retirement is but a dream

Saving for retirement is a source of financial anxiety for 29 percent of Americans, a recent survey by life insurer Northwestern Mutual estimated. Say hello to two members of that 29 percent: Gail and Sid Ouattara, of Everett. Frugal and focused on paying down their mortgage debt, Gail and Sid Ouattara are concerned they haven’t done enough to invest for retiring in a few years. http://www.seattletimes.com/business/frugal-couple-wonder-if-retirement-is-but-a-dream/

Read more
Retirees Need $130,000 Just to Cover Health Care, Study Finds

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter Today's 65-year-olds can expect to spend an average of $130,000 on health care during their retirement, from premiums to co-payments to eyeglasses, according to new estimates. The average single 65-year-old woman can expect to need $135,000 to spend on health care in retirement, while a man will spend $125,000, according to estimates from Fidelity Investments. (The difference is because the woman is expected

Read more
Private Equity Pursues Profits in Keeping the Elderly at Home

DENVER — Inside a senior center here, nestled along a bustling commercial strip, Vivian Malveaux scans her bingo card for a winning number. Her 81-year-old eyes are warm, lively and occasionally set adrift by the dementia plundering her mind. Dozens of elderly men and women — some in wheelchairs, others whose hands tremble involuntarily — gather excitedly around the game tables. After bingo, there is more entertainment and activities: Yahtzee,

Read more
New Medicare Law to Notify Patients of Loophole in Nursing Home Coverage

WASHINGTON — In November, after a bad fall, 85-year-old Elizabeth Cannon was taken to a hospital outside Philadelphia for six and a half days of “observation,” followed by nearly five months at a nearby nursing home for rehabilitation and skilled nursing care. The cost: more than $40,000. The hospital insisted that Ms. Cannon had never been formally admitted there as an inpatient, so under federal rules, Medicare would not pay for her nursing

Read more
Social Security Now Requires Cellphone to Use Online Services
Social Security signin

People seeking to manage their federal Social Security benefits online can no longer do so unless they provide a cellphone number so they can receive an access code by text each time they log on. The change, which took effect July 30, is part of an effort to improve online security, according to the Social Security Administration. Users with online “mySocialSecurity” accounts already could choose to use texted codes as an extra layer of security,

Read more
Surprise Medical Billing
washington seal

Surprise billing happens when you are treated by a medical provider at a hospital or facility that you believe is in your health plan's network. On top of paying your expected out-of-pocket costs, you're also charged the difference between what your insurer has agreed to pay your provider and what your provider believes the service was worth. This amount could be hundreds or thousands of dollars. “Consumers have been caught in the middle of these

Read more